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The Offa's Dyke Initiative press pack


The preview images below are available for media and public use. The photographs were taken for the Offa's Dyke Initiative by Richard Bishop, and are copyright to CPAT. They offer a range of views of Offa's Dyke, the Offa's Dyke Path National Trail and the Offa's Dyke Centre, and are arranged in the following geographical areas Flintshire and Denbighshire, Wrexham, north Shropshire, south Shropshire, Powys, Gloucestershire, and the Offa's Dyke Centre. To request publication quality copies (supplied as TIF files) please specify the reference number(s) of photographs and contact Chris Martin at the address below.

Flintshire and Denbighshire (Clwydian Hills AONB, Offa's Dyke Path not Offa's Dyke itself)


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Offa's Dyke Path, Penycloddiau Hillfort, Flintshire. A walker pauses on a 3500 year old Bronze Age burial mound fronted by the massive ramparts of a comparatively young 2500 year Iron Age hillfort!
Photo: CPAT 1133.31


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Foel Fenlli Hillfort, Denbighshire, with walkers on the Offa's Dyke Path. The National Trail follows the ramparts of a spectacular Iron Age hillfort with fine views over the patchwork fields of the Vale of Clwyd.
Photo: CPAT 1133.10


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Offa's Dyke Path, Foel Fenlli Hillfort, Denbighshire. In a typically breathtaking Offa's Dyke Path view, upland heather and lowland fields are starkly juxtaposed either side of the grassy hillfort rampart.
Photo: CPAT 1133.32


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Offa's Dyke Path, Foel Fenlli Hillfort, Denbighshire. The precipitous hillside is deeply scored by the encircling ramparts of a massive Iron Age hillfort which still glowers over the surrounding landscape some 2000 years after its abandonment.
Photo: CPAT 1133.34


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Offa's Dyke Path, Foel Fenlli Hillfort, Denbighshire. The dramatic heather clad ridge of the Clwydian Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty stretches southward, with each of the hilltops crowned by the ramparts of ancient Iron Age hillforts.
Photo: CPAT 1133.33



Wrexham


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Offa's Dyke, Ruabon, Wrexham. Despite the industrial past and urbanisation of towns like Ruabon, impressive stretches of the dyke still remain wedged between housing estates and playing fields.
Photo: CPAT 1133.27


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Offa's Dyke in garden, Ruabon, Wrexham. The dyke today survives in all kinds of different surroundings, and here forms an incongruous backdrop to the trellises and bird boxes of a local garden, complete with two young residents posing at the foot of the rampart!
Photo: CPAT 1133.26


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Offa's Dyke and path, Plas Offa, Wrexham. The National Trail follows the broad swale of the partly infilled dyke ditch, while long established trees crown the bank of the monument.
Photo: CPAT 1133.28



Shropshire, North


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Offa's Dyke and path, Bron-y-garth, Shropshire/Powys border. This massive section of the dyke was officially designated as the England/Wales border in the 16th century, and still serves as the national boundary today.
Photo: CPAT 1133.36


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Offa's Dyke and path, Orseddwen, Shropshire. The dyke is breached by a small stream, with the eroded crest of the rampart followed by a curious jumble of modern fencing.
Photo: CPAT 1133.29


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Offa's Dyke and path, Carreg-y-big, Shropshire. As in many places along the dyke, a modern farm has grown up along its line, emphasising the continuity of settlement from ancient times to the present.
Photo: CPAT 1133.30



Shropshire, South (Shropshire Hills AONB)


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Offa's Dyke and path, Nutwood, Shropshire. The unmistakable grassy ridge and hollow of the timeworn dyke meanders picturesquely through sun dappled woodlands.
Photo: CPAT 1133.38


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Offa's Dyke and path, Edenhope Hill, Shropshire. South of the Kerry Ridgeway, the well preserved dyke commences its dramatic 'switchback' course across the rolling terrain of the Clun area.
Photo: CPAT 1133.37


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Offa's Dyke and path, Middle Knuck, Shropshire. Wild foxgloves flourish beneath the shelter of larch trees planted along the ancient dyke bank.
Photo: CPAT 1133.41


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Offa's Dyke and path at Hergan Corner, Shropshire. In the Clun Hills the Offa's Dyke Path never strays far from the distinctive 'whaleback' ridge of the ancient earthwork.
Photo: CPAT 1133.25


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Offa's Dyke and path at Hergan, Shropshire. The twisted boughs of an old hawthorn tree spread across the remains of the dyke ditch now converted for use as an agricultural track.
Photo: CPAT 1133.23


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Offa's Dyke and path at Hergan, Shropshire. The dyke has been sculpted from the hillside to create an impressive bank and ditch.
Photo: CPAT 1133.22


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Erosion repair on Offa's Dyke and Path near Mardu, Shropshire. Walkers can cause erosion on the ancient earthwork, and in some places path surfacing has been carefully installed to minimise this.
Photo: CPAT 1133.48


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Offa's Dyke and path near Mardu, Shropshire. Near Mardu the dyke snakes through a pastoral landscape of farmsteads and fields largely created by agricultural enclosure in the 19th century.
Photo: CPAT 1133.24


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Offa's Dyke and path near Mardu, Shropshire. The dyke has long been colonised by woodland in this area, and the ditch of the dyke has become a lane now followed by the Offa's Dyke Path.
Photo: CPAT 1133.09


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Offa's Dyke Path stile and walkers near Mardu, Shropshire. Walkers enjoy a summer idyll as they follow Offa's Dyke through the timeless pastoral landscape of the Shropshire Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.
Photo: CPAT 1133.39


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Harebells on Offa's Dyke near Bryndrinog, Shropshire. As long undisturbed ground, the dyke earthworks are an important haven for flowers which have disappeared elsewhere.
Photo: CPAT 1133.21


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Offa's Dyke and Offa's Dyke path walkers above the Clun Valley, Shropshire. Recent management work here has included gorse clearance to help re-generate grass cover on the monument.
Photo: CPAT 1133.05


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Offa's Dyke and Offa's Dyke path walkers above the Clun Valley, Shropshire. The dyke picturesquely overlooks the small village of Newcastle.
Photo: CPAT 1133.06


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Offa's Dyke and path crossing the Clun Valley, Shropshire. The tree-lined dyke cuts across a valley which would have been a strategically important access route at the time the earthwork was built.
Photo: CPAT 1133.07


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Offa's Dyke at Springhill, Shropshire. The dyke dramatically strikes across the rolling upland landscape of the Clun Forest to reach its highest point at over 1400 feet.
Photo: CPAT 1133.04


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Offa's Dyke, Springhill, Shropshire. The great bank and ditch of Offa's Dyke has long evoked mystery and superstition, with one folk tradition stating that it was a furrow ploughed by the Devil!
Photo: CPAT 1133.40


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Offa's Dyke and Offa's Dyke Path walkers on Llanfair Hill, Shropshire. The path runs along the track to prevent erosion on the earthwork itself.
Photo: CPAT 1133.01


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Offa's Dyke on Llanfair Hill, Shropshire. The impressive bank and ditch of the dyke are starkly and well preserved in this upland landscape.
Photo: CPAT 1133.02


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Offa's Dyke and path on Panpunton Hill, Shropshire. The broad bank of the dyke follows a sinuous course along the edge of the Teme Valley.
Photo: CPAT 1133.03


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Offa's Dyke and Offa's Dyke path walkers on Panpunton Hill, Shropshire. The dyke provides sweeping western views towards Knighton and the pastoral hills and valleys of the old Welsh county of Radnorshire (Powys).
Photo: CPAT 1133.08



Powys


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Offa's Dyke and path, Rhos-y-meirch, Powys. As the dyke heads across the rolling hills and valleys of old county of Radnorshire, it frequently serves as a modern field boundary.
Photo: CPAT 1133.35


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Offa's Dyke and path near Discoed, Powys. Dyke, fields, fences and hedgerows intersect in contrasting linear patterns across the base of the Lugg Valley.
Photo: CPAT 1133.18


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Offa's Dyke and path near Discoed, Powys. A massive surviving section of the dyke rampart marches towards the distant bulk of Furrow Hill.
Photo: CPAT 1133.19


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Offa's Dyke and path at Pen Offa, Powys. Although the bank of the dyke has been much eroded by agriculture, it can still be traced as a grassy hump across this Radnorshire field.
Photo: CPAT 1133.20


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Offa's Dyke and path at Evenjobb, Powys. As it heads southwards towards Rushock Hill the dyke overlooks the rich farmland of the Radnor Valley.
Photo: CPAT 1133.13


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Offa's Dyke and path at Burfa, Powys. The dyke was deliberately constructed to command a fine western view towards the hills of Mid-Wales.
Photo: CPAT 1133.14


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View from Offa's Dyke and path at Burfa, Powys. On a late summer evening the freshly harvested fields of the Radnor Valley are bathed in golden light.
Photo: CPAT 1133.15



Gloucestershire (Wye Valley AONB)


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View of Tintern Abbey (Gwent) from Offa's Dyke and path at Devil's Pulpit, Gloucestershire. Today's National Trail walkers catch an evocative glimpse of romantic medieval ruins which inspired one of Wordsworth's most famous poems, and now form the centre piece of the Wye Valley Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.
Photo: CPAT 1133.17


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Offa's Dyke and path near Lippet's Grove, Gloucestershire. Offa's Dyke Path walkers follow the impressive earthwork as it twists through sun dappled ancient woodlands.
Photo: CPAT 1133.12


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Offa's Dyke and path near Passage Grove, Gloucestershire. National Trail walkers follow the in-filled ditch of the dyke, with the adjoining dyke rampart surviving close to its original height.
Photo: CPAT 1133.16


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Offa's Dyke and path near Tidenham, Gloucestershire. The massive bank of the dyke hugs the tree clad escarpment of the Lower Wye Valley.
Photo: CPAT 1133.11



Offa's Dyke Centre, Knighton, Powys


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Offa's Dyke Centre, Knighton. Children enjoy displays about the history of Offa's Dyke in the purpose built Offa's Dyke Centre, run by the volunteer based Offa's Dyke Association.
Photo: CPAT 1133.42


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Offa's Dyke Centre, Knighton. The Offa's Dyke Centre houses innovative displays introducing Offa's Dyke and the surrounding Marches landscape, and also provides a Tourist Information service for the area.
Photo: CPAT 1133.43


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Offa's Dyke Centre, Knighton. The newly built Offa's Dyke Centre is run by the Offa's Dyke Association, and is also the office base of the Offa's Dyke Path Officer.
Photo: CPAT 1133.44


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Offa's Dyke Centre, Knighton. Offa's Dyke Association staff are on hand to help answer visitor queries, including assistance with finding local accommodation.
Photo: CPAT 1133.45


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Offa's Dyke Centre, Knighton. The retail shop in the Offa's Dyke Centre offers a range of guidebooks, maps and local souvenirs for visitors and Offa's Dyke Path walkers.
Photo: CPAT 1133.46


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Offa's Dyke Centre, Knighton. The 'Knighton Room' is available for hire, and hosts a range of local community events from weddings to training courses and talks about Offa's Dyke.
Photo: CPAT 1133.47

For further information and advice please contact Chris Martin at,


Clwyd-Powys Archaeological Trust
41 Broad Street
WELSHPOOL
Powys
SY21 7RR

Tel. 01938 553670
Fax. 01938 552179
e-mail. chrismartin@cpat.org.uk


The Offa's Dyke Initiative is supported by Cadw and English Heritage and managed by Clwyd-Powys Archaeological Trust.

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